Creating Business Motivation Model diagram

A Business Motivation Model provides business enterprises a set of notations for forming business plans. It models things that the enterprise wishes to achieve, how to achieve, potential impacts, resources and etc.

A sample Business Motivation Model diagram
A sample Business Motivation Model diagram

Creating Business Motivation Model (BMM) diagram

To create a BMM diagram, take any of the steps below:

  • Click on Enterprise on toolbar and select Business Motivation Model Diagram
  • Right click on Business Motivation Model Diagram in Diagram Navigator and select New Business Motivation Model Diagram from the popup menu.
  • Select File > New Diagram > Enterprise Modeling > Business Motivation Model Diagram from the main menu.
Create a BMM through toolbar
Create a BMM through toolbar

Notations

The description of notations is taken from OMG BMM Specification v1.1.

Name Representation
Description
End
Ends are about what an enterprise wants to be.

Ends can be about changing what the enterprise is (e.g., developing new lines of business, moving into new markets) orabout maintaining its current position relative its market and competition. The definition of an end does not say how it will be achieved.
Vision
A Vision describes the future state of the enterprise, without regard to how it is to be achieved.

A Vision is the ultimate, possibly unattainable, state the enterprise would like to achieve. A Vision is often compound, rather than focused toward one particular aspect of the business problem. A Goal, in contrast, should generally be attainable and should be more specifically oriented to a single aspect of the business problem.
Goal
A Goal is a statement about a state or condition of the enterprise to be brought about or sustained through appropriate Means. A Goal amplifies a Vision; that is, it indicates what must be satisfied on a continuing basis to effectively attain the Vision.
Objective  
An Objective is a statement of an attainable, time-targeted, and measurable target that the enterprise seeks to meet in order to achieve its Goals.
Means  
Means are about what an enterprise has decided to do in order to become what it wants to be.

A Means is some "device, capability, regime, technique, restriction, agency, instrument, or method that may be called upon, activated, or enforced to achieve Ends." It does not include either the tasks (business processes and workflow)
necessary to exploit it, nor responsibility for such tasks.

In the Business Motivation Model, Means are organized into Mission, Courses of Action, and Directives.

A Mission indicates the ongoing operational activity of the enterprise. Its definition should be broad enough to cover all Strategies and the complete area of operations. An enterprise can use the Business Motivation Model without defining a Mission explicitly.
Mission  
A Mission indicates the ongoing operational activity of the enterprise. The Mission describes what the business is or will be doing on a day-to-day basis.

A Mission makes a Vision operative; that is, it indicates the ongoing activity that makes the Vision a reality. A Mission is planned by means of Strategies.
Strategy  
A Strategy is one component of the plan for the Mission. A Strategy represents the essential Course of Action to achieve Ends (Goals in particular). A Strategy usually channels efforts towards those Goals.

A Strategy is more than simply a resource, skill, or competency that the enterprise can call upon; rather, a Strategy is accepted by the enterprise as the right approach to achieve its Goals, given the environmental constraints and risks.
Tactic  
A Tactic is a Course of Action that represents part of the detailing of Strategies. A Tactic implements Strategies. For example, the Tactic "Call first-time customers personally" implements the Strategy "Increase repeat business."
Business Policy  
A Business Policy is a Directive that is not directly enforceable whose purpose is to govern or guide the enterprise. Business Policies provide the basis for Business Rules. Business Policies also govern Business Processes.

The formulation of a Business Policy, which is always under the enterprise’s control, is by some party who is authorized to manage, control, or regulate the enterprise by selecting from a variety of alternatives in response to one or more Assessments.

Business Policies that exist merely to enable a Strategy in a direct and trivial manner should be avoided. For example, suppose the enterprise has the Strategy "Encourage repeat business." A Business Policy that says "Repeat business should
be encouraged" is trivial and does not need to be expressed.

In general Business Policies exist to govern; that is, control, guide, and shape the Strategies and Tactics. For example, the Business Policy "We will not make on-site visits" governs the Strategy "Encourage repeat business," as well as the specific Tactics that might be selected to implement the Strategy. Specifically, no Tactic requiring on-site visits will be permitted to support the Strategy; even though on-site visits would probably be effective in that regard. On the other hand, a Tactic involving sending coupons by mail would be acceptable under the Business Policy since it involves no onsite visits.
Business Rule
A Business Rule is a Directive, intended to govern, guide, or influence business behavior, in support of Business Policy that has been formulated in response to an Opportunity, Threat, Strength, or Weakness. It is a single Directive that does
not require additional interpretation to undertake Strategies or Tactics. Often, a Business Rule is derived from Business Policy. Business Rules guide Business Processes.

Formally, a Business Rule is a rule that is under business jurisdiction. A rule always introduces an obligation or necessity.
Internal Influencer  
An Influencer is something that can cause changes that affect the enterprise in its employment of its Means or achievement of its Ends. Alternatively, it might confirm that there are no changes where changes might have been expected.

Influencers may be Internal (from within the enterprise) or External (from outside the enterprise boundary). If the enterprise being modeled is an Organization Unit within a larger organization, it may choose to treat the larger organization as an External Influencer.
The Business Motivation Model provides an example set of categories of Influencer. In practice, enterprises define their own set.
External Influencer
An Influencer is something that can cause changes that affect the enterprise in its employment of its Means or achievement of its Ends. Alternatively, it might confirm that there are no changes where changes might have been expected.

Influencers may be Internal (from within the enterprise) or External (from outside the enterprise boundary). If the enterprise being modeled is an Organization Unit within a larger organization, it may choose to treat the larger organization as an External Influencer.
The Business Motivation Model provides an example set of categories of Influencer. In practice, enterprises define their own set.
Assessment
An influence (a change caused by an Influencer) is neutral. It is more or less simply just 'there' until the enterprise decides how to react to it. An Assessment is a judgment about the influence on the enterprise’s ability to employ its Means or achieve its Ends. The decisions are reflected in changes to the Ends and/or Means.

Different people might make different Assessments of a given influence on the same Ends and Means, perhaps even the same people at different points in time. The model supports a record of which people made which Assessments and when, providing an audit trail for future reference.

The Business Motivation Model suggests SWOT (Strength, Weakness, Opportunity, Threat) as an example of an approach for making assessments. In practice, enterprises can substitute different approaches.

The model also includes Potential Impacts that can be identified to support Assessments. Potential Impacts are categorized as Risk and Potential Reward.

As well as more general associations between Assessment, Ends and Means, there is a direct association "Directive is motivated by Potential Impact." This is one of the minor enhancements in version 1.1 of the Business Motivation Model, based on experience of using the model in risk management.
Risk  
An Assessment records judgments about the impact (or potential for impact) of some Influencer on Ends and/or Means in terms of Potential Impacts. In other words, an Assessment identifies some Potential Impact(s) that is/are significant to that
Assessment. Each Potential Impact is an evaluation that quantifies or qualifies some aspect of an Assessment in specific terms, types, or dimensions.

A Potential Impact significant to an Assessment can provide the impetus for Directives that govern Courses of Action or support the achievement of Ends. An Influencer may lead to the creation of a Business Policy only through an Assessment having been made that identifies some Potential Impact.

Potential Impacts are categorized as follows: Risk, Potential Reward. Typically, Risks are regarded to be negative impacts, whereas Rewards are considered positive.
Potential Reward  
An Assessment records judgments about the impact (or potential for impact) of some Influencer on Ends and/or Means in terms of Potential Impacts. In other words, an Assessment identifies some Potential Impact(s) that is/are significant to that Assessment. Each Potential Impact is an evaluation that quantifies or qualifies some aspect of an Assessment in specific terms, types, or dimensions.

A Potential Impact significant to an Assessment can provide the impetus for Directives that govern Courses of Action or support the achievement of Ends. An Influencer may lead to the creation of a Business Policy only through an Assessment having been made that identifies some Potential Impact.

Potential Impacts are categorized as follows: Risk, Potential Reward. Typically, Risks are regarded to be negative impacts, whereas Rewards are considered positive.
Organization Unit  
Organization Unit has two roles:
1. It is a concept in the Business Motivation Model, participating in the following associations:
   • defines Ends,
   • establishes Means,
   • makes Assessments,
   • recognizes Influencers,
   • may be defined by a Strategy, and
   • may be responsible for Business Processes.

2. It is usually the basis for defining the boundaries of the enterprise being modeled. The decomposition of Business Policies, Courses of Action, and Desired Results and assignment of responsibilities within the enterprise is often guided by (or, at least, consistent with) the definition of units within the organization structure.
Asset  
When Courses of Action are being defined, 'things' that are used in operating the enterprise often have to be considered. They are represented in the Model as Assets, of two kinds:
• Fixed Assets - things that are kept long-term, maintained, reused, and perhaps eventually replaced. They can be tangible, such as equipment and buildings, or intangible, such as patents and licenses.
• Resources - things that are consumed and replenished, such as raw materials, parts, finished goods, and cash.
Amplify
N/A
Quantify
N/A
Channel Efforts
N/A
Effect Enforcement Level
N/A
Enable N/A
Implement
N/A
Regulate
N/A
Judge
N/A
Use
N/A
Provide Impetus
N/A
Govern
N/A
Responsible
N/A
Source
N/A
Composition
N/A
A list of supported notations in Business Motivation Model (BMM) diagram

Related Resources

The following resources may help you learn more about the topic discussed in this page.

 
Chapter 2. Business Motivation Model diagram Table of Contents Chapter 3. ArchiMate diagram
 

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